Mikkel got great initial feedback

Mikkel got great initial feedback

By: Anne Mette Ehlers

By: Anne Mette Ehlers

At Telia's first Idea Garage in Copenhagen, Mikkel Vilstrup was especially nervous. This was the first time he had ever presented his idea. Telia spoke to him after the pitch.

"Incredibly nerve-wracking. It is uncomfortable to share your thoughts and say 'I'm putting everything into this, I hope you understand'."
There is a lot on the table when you want to get others to understand your idea and you set out to explain a complex problem in a short time, so others will invest in the solution and will want to know more.

This is how it was for 25-year-old Mikkel Vilstrup when he stood in front of four judges and the audience at Telia's Idea Garage and presented his idea for the first time.

Mikkel

25-year-old Mikkel Vilstrup is about to start his final year at DTU, where he is studying Effective and Intelligent Systems.


A sales system for sales people
Just two months ago, he got the idea for a flexible and dynamic sales system to handle companies' customer relationships. It is to be developed as a CRM system centred around a chat function, and hold all the messages, e-mails and events relating to the sales people, so no knowledge gets lost in the organisation.
"The sales people are outward-looking and have a load of knowledge, but we risk losing that knowledge if they leave, for example," explains Mikkel.

Instead, this valuable knowledge will be stored and exploited on the new platform.
"A bit like a kind of Messenger, which picks up the relationships and can see what data you are acting on, because it is stored chronologically."

Gave up his academic job
Mikkel Vilstrup has such faith in his idea that he has given up his academic job, where he also worked with a sales system that did not work as well as it might. He is so happy that he can spend his last year at DTU on his idea, as part of his course.
"I can take the plunge on my student grant, and with complete freedom, so the conditions are ideal. I have always dreamed of starting my own business, and now I have had the right idea, although it is hard to know where it will lead."

Lacks a team
But there is one thing he lacks, and that is a team. And that was the judges' main concern after the pitch.
"Yes, unfortunately I'm alone. It is a big project and it will be tough for me to do it all myself. But it is very important for me to choose the right people, because once I have chosen, I will be committed. So right now, I would rather get through the hard period by myself."
He has asked his friends, but not many of them are seriously prepared to spend time and energy on improving sales.
"You have to have a natural feel for that if you are going to spend so much of your life on it."

Feedback helps to fine-tune
He is very glad of the feedback from the judges and others.
"I try to be as open as possible. If there is a problem, which is hard to solve, you shouldn't be afraid of others taking the idea, so you don't have so much to lose. The knowledge you get back is invaluable. You can easily go off on a tangent in your own head. Every person you meet can send you off in a new direction, and that way you get a feel for how the world is."
To judge from the stream of people who want to talk to Mikkel after the pitch, his idea is one of the most successful. People are almost queuing up to talk to him, meet for coffee and leave their cards, including one of the judges.

At Telia’s first Idea Garage in Copenhagen, Mikkel Vilstrup was especially nervous. This was the first time he had ever presented his idea. Telia spoke to him after the pitch.

 

“Incredibly nerve-wracking. It is uncomfortable to share your thoughts and say ‘I’m putting everything into this, I hope you understand’.”

There is a lot on the table when you want to get others to understand your idea and you set out to explain a complex problem in a short time, so others will invest in the solution and will want to know more.

This is how it was for 25-year-old Mikkel Vilstrup when he stood in front of four judges and the audience at Telia’s Idea Garage and presented his idea for the first time.

A sales system for sales people

Just two months ago, he got the idea for a flexible and dynamic sales system to handle companies’ customer relationships. It is to be developed as a CRM system centred around a chat function, and hold all the messages, e-mails and events relating to the sales people, so no knowledge gets lost in the organisation.

“The sales people are outward-looking and have a load of knowledge, but we risk losing that knowledge if they leave, for example,” explains Mikkel.

Instead, this valuable knowledge will be stored and exploited on the new platform.

“A bit like a kind of Messenger, which picks up the relationships and can see what data you are acting on, because it is stored chronologically.”

 

Gave up his academic job
Mikkel Vilstrup has such faith in his idea that he has given up his academic job, where he also worked with a sales system that did not work as well as it might. He is so happy that he can spend his last year at DTU on his idea, as part of his course.

“I can take the plunge on my student grant, and with complete freedom, so the conditions are ideal. I have always dreamed of starting my own business, and now I have had the right idea, although it is hard to know where it will lead.”

 

Lacks a team

But there is one thing he lacks, and that is a team. And that was the judges’ main concern after the pitch. 

“Yes, unfortunately I’m alone. It is a big project and it will be tough for me to do it all myself. But it is very important for me to choose the right people, because once I have chosen, I will be committed. So right now, I would rather get through the hard period by myself.”

He has asked his friends, but not many of them are seriously prepared to spend time and energy on improving sales.

“You have to have a natural feel for that if you are going to spend so much of your life on it.”

 

Feedback helps to fine-tune

He is very glad of the feedback from the judges and others.

“I try to be as open as possible. If there is a problem, which is hard to solve, you shouldn’t be afraid of others taking the idea, so you don’t have so much to lose. The knowledge you get back is invaluable. You can easily go off on a tangent in your own head. Every person you meet can send you off in a new direction, and that way you get a feel for how the world is.”

To judge from the stream of people who want to talk to Mikkel after the pitch, his idea is one of the most successful. People are almost queuing up to talk to him, meet for coffee and leave their cards, including one of the judges.